Institute for International Law and Public Policy





The Institute's inaugural Roundtable focused China's accession to the World Trade Organization. Five leading Chinese academics, a judge from the Supreme People's Court, the Director of WTO Legal Affairs at China's Ministry of Foreign Trade and Economic Cooperation, and a leading practitioner (and former diplomat) to spend approximately one month during the summer of 2002 at Temple.

During their stay, the Chinese visitors engaged in extensive legal research and study related to the WTO. This multi-dimensional study included a lively series of "brown bag" lunch-time seminars presented by Temple faculty, including presentations on WTO law by Professor Jeffrey Dunoff; on electronic commerce law by Professor Amy Boss; on the nature of legal reasoning by Professor Richard Greenstein; on current developments at the U.S. Supreme Court by Professor Laura Little; and on judicial review by Dean Robert Reinstein.

Faculty from other schools also participated. University of Pennsylvania Law School Professor Jacques de Lisle presented a talk on the "myths" surrounding China's WTO accession; Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy Professor Joel Trachtman gave a talk on the economic analysis of international law; and Wharton School Professor Edward Swaine delivered a paper on federalism and the relationships between international and domestic law.

The Institute also arranged a series of meetings with government officials and others directly engaged in U.S.-China trade relations. In a series of briefings in Washington, D.C., the Chinese scholars had in-depth discussions with senior staff from the Congressional-Executive Commission on China, with businesspeople engaged in international trade at the U.S.-China Business Council, and with attorneys from the Office of the United States Trade Representative and the Commerce Department's Office of Chief Counsel for International Commerce with responsibility for U.S.-China trade issues. A series of events in Philadelphia included a visit to the Philadelphia Stock Exchange, a tour of historic Philadelphia, and an evening enjoying America's national pastime: a Phillies baseball game at Veteran's Stadium.

To conclude their stay, the Chinese scholars presented their research to North American-based WTO experts during a two day "Roundtable." Dr. Sylvia Ostry, Distinguished Research Fellow at the Centre for International Studies at the University of Toronto, and formerly Canada's Deputy Minister of International Trade and Ambassador for Multilateral Trade Negotiations, presented a keynote address at the Roundtable and participated in the Roundtable discussion. Other commentators included several legal scholars and individuals from the private sector, international organizations, policy institutes and trade ministries.

The papers resulting from the Roundtable were published in Spring 2003 in a symposium issue of the Temple International and Comparative Law Journal, accompanied by a short introduction and summary of the 2002 U.S.-China Roundtable by Institute Co-Directors Professors Amy Boss and Jeff Dunoff, 17 Temp. Int'l & Comp L.J. 97 (2003), and a commentary on China's involvement in the WTO by Steve Charnovitz, 17 Temp. Int'l & Comp. L.J. 105 (2003).



2005 U.S. - China Private International Law Roundtable

2004 U.S.-China Environmental Law and Policy Roundtable

2003 U.S.-China Internet Law and Commerce Roundtable

2002 U.S.-China WTO Roundtable