Institute for International Law and Public Policy





China 's recent emergence into the world economy has greatly magnified the potential for transnational legal disputes involving Chinese parties. As a result of increased international litigation and arbitration, China 's private international law rules, including its choice of law rules, are receiving increasing attention from diplomats, legal scholars, and practitioners. Efforts are currently underway in China to draft new laws addressing conflicts issues and other private international law matters. In addition, China is playing a significant role in the formation of new private international law treaties, as demonstrated by the leading role it played in the negotiation of the new Hague Convention on Choice of Courts.

In recognition of these developments, the Institute selected Private International Law as the theme for the summer 2005 Roundtable. As in years past, the Institute invited leading Chinese experts, including the head of the Chinese delegation to the Hague Conference on Private International Law, several of the drafters of the new proposed legislation on conflicts of law, and leaders of such influential groups as the China Society of International Law and the China Maritime Law Association.


Selected for their expertise and contributions to the development of Chinese private international law, the scholars spent the month in the United States doing intensive research and study. The month included meetings with U.S. scholars, private practitioners, government officials, and judges to discuss their work and learn more about the American judicial system.

The Roundtable on July 26th and 27th, at which each of the scholars circulated their draft papers and presented the results of their research, represented the culmination of the scholars' work in the United States. Joining them for the two day Roundtable was a distinguished panel of experts, headed by two of the world's leading experts, Dean Symeon Symeonides of Willamette School of Law and Russell Weintraub, the Ben H. & Kitty King Powell Chair Emeritus in Business & Commercial Law at the University of Texas School of Law, who delivered keynote presentations. The Roundtable covered issues critical to the development of Chinese law, including constitutional and inter-regional choice of law (a critical topic with the recent return of Hong Kong and Macao to China), international arbitration and enforcement of judgments, the Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act, choice of law rules, maritime law, renvoi, and the most significant relationship doctrine.

The papers presented at the 2005 U.S.-China Private International Law Roundtable are currently being edited jointly by the authors and the experts present at the Roundtable. They will be published in the Chinese Yearbook of Private International Law and Comparative Law published by Wuhan University in China and in a U.S. legal journal.


2005 U.S. - China Private International Law Roundtable

2004 U.S.-China Environmental Law and Policy Roundtable

2003 U.S.-China Internet Law and Commerce Roundtable

2002 U.S.-China WTO Roundtable